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Rich Pins allow Pinterest to display extra information about you and your website when pinning content from your website. It’s a great way to stand out on Pinterest and makes it easier to drive traffic back to your therapy website.

In this post we’ll go over what Rich Pins are exactly and how to get started using them on your own Pinterest profile and private practice website.

Rich Pins allow Pinterest to display extra information about you and your website when pinning content from your website. It’s a great way to stand out on Pinterest and makes it easier to drive traffic back to your therapy website. In this post we’ll go over what Rich Pins are exactly and how to get started using them on your own Pinterest profile and private practice website.

What Are Pinterest Rich Pins?

Rich pins are a way for Pinterest to provide some extra information about your website along with pins that link back to your pages and posts.

By enabling a bit of code on your website, it allows Pinterest to gather a little information about any content pinned from your website.

A bold title, your website name and your profile picture all appear with your pin to let pinners know more about who they’re repinning and where the content came from.

Here’s an example of what Rich Pins do:

pinterest for therapists rich pin

All this extra info will help you stand out in the busy Pinterest feed.

Notice how Rich Pins display your blog titles clear and gives your ideal audience more chances to click over to your website.

And tests have shown that Rich Pins have been proven to increase traffic.

So you’re going want to set up this functionality if you’re using Pinterest to promote your private practice blog.

You may be wondering, what does a NON Rich Pin look like?

For comparison’s sake, here’s an example:

pinterest non rich pin

There’s no extra information, such as a bold title for the content, a “read it” button, or “Article from” highlight of the author’s Pinterest profile.

This can result in less repins, fewer follows and less traffic back to the original website’s content.

Getting Started With Rich Pins for Your Therapy Website

Setting up this extra Pinterest functionality does not take long and has tons of benefits.

And you can set it up once, and then any content pinned from your website will display as a Rich Pin.

In order to enable Rich Pins, you have to have what’s called “Open Graph” code on your website.

This is the same type of code that Facebook uses to pull in information for links you share on their platform.

The process is a little different depending on which website platform you use. So I’ll cover a few of the most popular ones below.

Using WordPress to Set Up Rich Pins

The process to enable Rich Pins is extremely easy when using WordPress.

Step 1: Install the Yoast SEO plugin

Step 2: Click on “Social” under the Yoast SEO settings

rich pins yoast 1

Step 3: Click on the Facebook tab and make sure Open Graph is enabled

rich pins yoast 2

Step 4: Validate your Rich Pins with Pinterest using their Rich Pin Validator

rich pin validator

Once validated, Pinterest will show you the information they see for your website:

rich pin pinterest validated

Using Other Website Platforms to Enable Rich Pins

Wix: Setting up Rich Pins with Wix

Squarespace: Already supported when you link your Pinterest account from within Squarespace settings. Once linked, run the Rich Pin Validator here.

Weebly: You’ll have to first add the Open Graph code to your website’s “Head” code. Check out the instructions here.

How Using Pinterest led to a 15x increase in traffic to my own website… in just 6 months.

Rich Pins are just one of many simple strategies you can use to help drive lots of traffic to your private practice website using Pinterest.

Now, I’ve spent the last couple years testing what works and doesn’t work for driving traffic to websites.

And Pinterest can be a game changer.

It currently accounts for more than 90% of all traffic to this here site… and all without having to pay for my content to be seen (like you have to do on Facebook).

And after just 6 months of using Pinterest strategically I saw a 15x increase in my traffic!

I’d like to share this Pinterest strategy with you…

Because what I’ve learned is that it’s not rocket science, so anyone can follow this system to see an uptick in their own website traffic.

So I’ve compiled together my favorite traffic-driving tactics, combining blogging with simple Pinterest strategies to help you grow your website traffic quickly into a free, 10-day email challenge.

Ready to use Pinterest to explode your traffic, grow your audience and attract more of your ideal clients? Join the free 10-day Kickstart Your Blog Traffic Challenge by clicking the banner below:

Click here to join the free challenge

 

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Pinterest isn’t just for recipes, workout plans, and dream weddings. It’s actually a great way to drive traffic to your private practice’s website.

Did you know that Pinterest is the second largest driver of traffic, second only to Facebook?

So, if you’ve been weary about trying a new social media platform, below are 5 reasons why you need to be using Pinterest to your advantage.

Pinterest isn’t just for recipes, workout plans, and dream weddings. It’s actually a great way to drive traffic to your private practice’s website.

Reason #1: Pinterest has over 150 million users (and growing) who are providing details about their psychographics.

Whether they’re looking for inspirational quotes or have a board dedicated completely to self-care tips, your ideal clients are identifying themselves daily.

Using attractive graphics and optimizing your captions with keywords specific to your niche will draw your future clients directly to your site.

Your potential clients are using Pinterest already, so use it as an opportunity to attract them with content relevant to your private practice and expertise.

Reason #2: Your clients are open and receptive to your message.

In fact, they’re looking for it.

By being consistent with the design of your pin images and consistently providing content that will serve your ideal client, you can stand out as an expert in your field.

And as they become receptive to your helpful content, your target audience may be more likely to contact you, set up an appointment, and become a regular client.

I can’t promise this is going to happen overnight, but as traffic increases over time it does increase the likelihood of converting visitors to clients.

Reason #3: Pinterest can increase traffic to your therapy website exponentially.

When someone pins a post, it’s shared to their friends and followers. This means an entire network of individuals will be seeing your content.

The best part is that this can work exponentially in your favor to bring you loads of traffic.

For example, if you pin an image that links to your blog post and you only have 400 followers, it has the potential of being seen by those 400 individuals.

But if one of those 400 individuals REPINS your content and THEY have 4,000 followers, well you have the potential getting your pin (and clicks to your website) in front of 4,000 more people.

And on and on it goes.

So, more eyes means more traffic. More traffic means more prospective clients.

Reason #4: Your audience is looking for the inspiration and content that you can provide.

Since 66% of people on Pinterest are using the platform for that purpose, give them what they’re looking for.

You see, Pinterest is really a search engine… NOT a social media website.

Pinterest is a place where people go to find answers and it’s a great place to provide answers by pinning your blog posts there regularly.

Ensure your messaging is both inspirational and actionable, giving your future clients a roadmap to follow that ultimately leads directly to you.

Whether they’re numbered lists or how to’s, providing the right content to the right audience on the right platform could be a game changer for your private practice.

Reason #5: Pinterest can help with your SEO

One thing that search engines pay attention to is something called “social signals.”

Social signals do play a role in organic and local search engine optimization. Search engines want to show their users the most relevant and engaging content.

As people interact with your pins and traffic increases over time, it can cause a positive impact on your local search engine rankings.

So when potential, local clients search for services related to your practice, Google will be more likely to show them your website, as it sees that Pinterest is sending many other engaged users to your content.

And beyond local search, your pins can (and probably will) pop up from time to time in Google search results, eventually leading traffic back to your website.

Is Your Private Practice on Pinterest Yet? If not, read on…

Personally, Pinterest is my FAVORITE way to drive traffic to any website.

It currently accounts for more than 90% of all traffic to this here site… and all without having to pay for my content to be seen (like you have to do on Facebook).

In fact, using Pinterest led to a 15x increase in traffic to my own website… in just 6 months.

It required a little bit of strategy (but ANYONE can do it)

I’d like to share this Pinterest strategy with you inside this challenge

Because what I’ve learned is that it’s not rocket science, so anyone can follow this system to see an uptick in their own website traffic.

Ready to use Pinterest to explode your traffic, grow your audience and attract more of your ideal clients? Join the free 10-day Kickstart Your Blog Traffic Challenge by clicking the banner below:

Click here to join the free challenge

 

Understanding your audience is critical to the success of your private practice. Web traffic stats give you a clear picture of who is visiting, where they’re coming from, how long they’re on your site, and so much more. And with Google Analytics, all of this information is free!

Getting Started With Google Analytics Pinterest. Understanding your audience is critical to the success of your private practice. Web traffic stats give you a clear picture of who is visiting, where they’re coming from, how long they’re on your site, and so much more. And with Google Analytics, all of this information is free!

Getting started with Google Analytics can be a bit daunting at first, but after a few simple clicks, and some basic knowledge of how to read reports, you’ll be ready to refine your content to reach your target audience – your future clients!

For example, is your traffic peaking at a specific time? Then that’s when you know to post new content!

Is it coming from a specific source, like Pinterest? Now you know where to focus your marketing efforts!

Here’s how you get started:

 

Step 1: Create a Google Account

This one is rather simple, especially if you already have a Google or Gmail account!

Just click on the Google Analytics Sign Up page and either register or login, if you already have an account.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 9.06.15 AM

Step 2: Sign up for Google Analytics

Once you’ve logged in to your Google account, you’ll see this screen. Click on “Sign Up” to start your Google Analytics account.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 9.07.34 AM

Step 3: Set up your website tracking

The following screen will prompt you to enter some information regarding your website. It gives you the option of entering information for a Website or a Mobile site.

VERY IMPORTANT – Choose “Website”! Then enter the information requested.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 9.11.24 AM

Step 4: Get your tracking code

Once you’ve gone through the aforementioned steps, Google Analytics will provide you with your own unique tracking code.

Once that code is entered into your WordPress site, ideally through a plugin, data will bounce back and forth between the two tools, providing you with all the information you need about your audience!

The tracking code page looks a little something like this:

gatrackingcode

Not Using WordPress?

Click on the website platform you’re using to view instructions on where you’ll need to place your Google Analytics tracking code:

Useful Reports:

Now that Google Analytics is up and running efficiently, you’re going to want to monitor your reports.

The ones I find most useful are:

  • Audience Overview (bird’s eye view of what your audience is doing)
  • Audience Demographics (characteristics of your audience including age, interests, gender, etc)
  • Acquisition Overview (where your audience is coming from)
  • Acquisition Social (what social media platforms your audience is coming from)
  • Behavior Overview (what your audience is doing while on your site).

Here is the Audience Overview Dashboard:

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 12.24.55 PM

Here, you can see how many new visitors there are vs returning visitors, the total number of people visiting the site in a given time period (May 29-June 4), and on average how long they were on the site.

The metrics you monitor can be changed in the drop down menu under “Overview”.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 12.28.24 PM

If you ever get stuck, Google Analytics has a built in tutor to walk you through reading reports in each section.

Screen Shot 2017 06 05 at 12.30.55 PM

Conclusion

The more you know, the better you can serve your prospective patients.

Using Google Analytics on your private practice website is an easy way to learn all you can about your audience in real time, make necessary changes, and draw even more traffic to your business.

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Your logo is the identity of your business and one of the first things clients may notice when landing on your website. The time has come to design a logo for your private practice if you don’t have one.

In this post we’ll discuss your options for creating a logo to give your therapy practice a sense of identity and make you proud to flash your business cards any chance you get.

Your logo is the identity of your business and one of the first things clients may notice when landing on your therapy website. In this post we’ll discuss your options for creating a logo to give your therapy practice a sense of identity and make you proud to flash your business cards any chance you get.

Where To Begin

A blank canvas can be daunting and you may not even know what you want your private practice logo to look and feel like.

So, this is where I always start: inspiration.

Start collecting logos you love. Logos that make you feel how you want your clients to feel when they come across your business.

One of my favorite resources for logo design inspiration is a website called Logopond.

I’m blown away by the creativity of the designer-submitted logos on that website.

You could even start a Pinterest board just for the logos you find inspiring.

Here’s a board I created to get your creative juices flowing:

After you collect a good number of logos that you love, start to describe WHY you love them.

Write it out on a piece of paper or save it in a Word doc for later.

Whether you create a logo yourself (I’ll explain how in a moment) or hire a designer to do it, this description will guarantee you end up with a logo you love.

This is especially important when working with a designer, where it’s up to YOU to communicate what you desire your logo to look and feel like.

Now, there are two ways to get a professional looking logo for your therapy practice: you could design the logo yourself or hire someone to do it.

Let’s talk about each of these approaches and things to consider for each.

Free private practice logo design cheatsheet

Designing Your Own Logo

You don’t have to have 4 years of design school experience to create a great logo for your private practice.

One of the reasons I recommend that you start with collecting examples of logos you love is that it helps you see the patterns, the balance and the layout of good logo design.

You can choose a logo you love, then mimic the feeling of it with your own logo.

Using Canva to Design Your Therapy Practice Logo

Canva.com is an awesome design website and app that allows you to create beautiful graphics for pretty much all your business design needs.

They’ve made it really easy to create backgrounds, add text and design elements and save those images to your computer.

1. To get started with Canva, go to canva.com and create your free account:

Use Canva to design a psychotherapy logo

2. Start a new, blank design by clicking the “Use Custom Dimensions” button on the top right:

canva logos for therapists and counselors

3. Enter the dimensions you want to use to create your logo:

logo dimensions for private practice

The size you choose depends on how you’re going to use it. If you’re using it on your website, you may have to try a few different sizes depending on your website’s theme. You can always make it smaller later, but making it bigger once your logo is complete may lead to reduced quality in the image.

4. Start in the “Text” section of the Canva interface to begin designing your logo:

design a private practice logo with canva

You can drag and drop headings and subheadings onto your canvas, or you can choose from pre-existing free text layouts.

In the screenshot above, I chose one of the pre-existing layouts with a header and subheader.

5. Update the text with your info:

therapist logo design

You can click on the text, highlight and then make changes. Use the toolbar across the top to make changes to the size, color or font.

6. When finished, download your private practice logo:

download your private practice logo

7. Click the final “download” button and let it do its thing:

download your therapist logo

That’s it!

You can get as fancy as you want using Canva. It’s really all up to you and your imagination and patience.

You could take a look at the “Elements” section within Canva to add shapes, lines and more to your logos.

One thing to note: The free version of Canva does not let you download your logo with a transparent background.

A transparent background could be useful if you were giving you logo to a designer to use it in various ways, laying your logo on top of different color backgrounds.

But it’s a great free option for a simple logo when you need something done, like when you’re about launch a new website.

Using Photoshop to Design a Logo for your Private Practice

A more advanced option for designing your logo is to use the graphic design application, Photoshop.

Photoshop is not free, however, you can download a 30-day trial version of it at adobe.com.

I include this option for those of you who are already using Photoshop to some degree to create design materials for your private practice.

The process of creating a logo is pretty similar to using Canva, however you have more flexibility with the many tools that Photoshop comes with.

Using Photoshop means you can use any font that’s on your computer.

Oftentimes, having a great font that you love is half the battle of designing your logo.

You can do a search for fonts using Pinterest and you’ll find a plethora to choose from.

Because of the advanced nature of Photoshop, I don’t recommend this route if you’re unfamiliar with the program.

Unless you have a strong desire to learn it, the learning curve could end up sucking a lot of your time up.

For that reason, I won’t get into the steps you’d take within Photoshop.

I did, however create a free Photoshop template for a private practice logo if you’re a little familiar with the application and want to get started.

Here’s a couple examples for what you can make with the template:

logos-for-counselors-example1 therapist logo examples

Click here to download the free photoshop logo template.

I included instructions within the template to edit the text, as well as the fonts I used.

If all this design-talk just makes you want to run and hide, then it’s probably time for you to hire someone to create a logo for your private practice.

So let’s talk more about that…

Hiring a Designer to Create a Logo for your Private Practice

Sometimes it just pays to hire someone to create something you’ll truly be proud of.

Since your logo will be the identity of your therapy practice, this is one of those cases where it can be a great idea to get a professional to design it.

You have plenty of resources when it comes to hiring a designer for your logo, from inexpensive to expensive.

Here are some places to for designers…

Fiverr

Using Fiverr to design a therapist logo

Fiverr.com is an online directory of freelancers you can hire small projects in your business.

From blog posts, to social media help to logo design, you can find it on Fiverr.

It’s a great inexpensive place to find someone to help you with your private practice logo.

You can start by searching for logo designers here.

When you click into a designer’s logo “gig”, you’ll see the various packages that they offer.

Some have more advanced options – like two logo concepts instead of just one – that you may be interested in.

Do your best to read the various reviews of each designer you’re interested in to help you decide who to work with.

99Designs

How to use 99Designs to design a logo for your private practice

I love the concept of 99designs.com (afilliate link).

99Designs let’s you run “contests” by crowd-sourcing designs from their network of over 1 million designers.

You create a design contest by entering some info about what you’re looking for (in this case, a logo) and some of your design preferences.

99Designs then finds designers to create your logo and submit them to you.

You then have a bunch of options to choose from and can even have your friends vote on the ones they like too!

The best part is that if you don’t like ANY options, you don’t have to pay.

Click here to check out 99Designs.

Upwork

Use Upwork to find a freelance designer for your private practice logo design

Upwork is a website where you can either find a freelancer or offer your freelance services.

It’s a great directory where you can search for a logo designer from all around the world and for various prices.

All you have to do is post your project description, provide details about what you’re looking for and freelance designers will send you proposals.

This allows you to find a designer that will fit your budget and timeline.

Click here to get started with Upwork.

Ask For a Referral in a Facebook Group

I’ve always found that the best people to hire are those referred to me by others I know.

My last recommendation for finding a designer for your private practice logo is to ask for a recommendation.

If you work in a group practice or know a few colleagues, try reaching out to them to find out who designed their logos.

Another great place to get a ton of recommendations quickly are the various Facebook groups out there for folks in private practice.

If you’re not in any, I highly recommend jumping in today. The support for your business in these groups can be amazing.

You can try the Abundance Practice Builders or Selling the Couch Facebook groups, just to name a couple.

Get the FREE Cheatsheet for Private Practice Logo Design

There are so many great options for creating your private practice logo.

Whether you create one yourself or hire someone, there are still many design choices to make and things to consider.

How to choose colors, how to find fonts, etc.

That’s why I created this FREE cheatsheet, to help you get going and quickly get the perfect logo for your private practice.

Just click on the banner below to download your free cheatsheet.

Free private practice logo design cheatsheet

Today we’re going to talk about how to use Pinterest to market your therapy practice.

What did I ever do before Pinterest? How would I have known I could build so many things out of pallets? Or cook such amazing (and simple) dinners while my wife (the therapist) is seeing clients well into the evening hours?

Aside from recipes and craft ideas, there is wealth of information on Pinterest. And the potential to use it to drive traffic to your website is HUGE.

Just a couple stats about Pinterest:

  • More than 100 million people using Pinterest*
  • It is the 2nd largest referrer of social traffic**
  • 96% of pinners use it to research and gather information**

*Source: blog.pinterest.com
**Source: whiteglovesocialmedia.com

The Benefits of Pinterest for Therapists:

Clearly, Pinterest is where a LOT of people are spending time online, so your potential audience is huge.

Another benefit is discoverability. When you tweet a link or post it on Facebook, it tends to get lost. Burried in the social media shuffle. What I like about Pinterest is that the shelf life of your pins is potentially endless. If you create engaging pins with descriptions that help people find them, it means at any time in the future, your content can be found and traffic driven to your website.

What’s great too is that Pinterest is a place where people go to research topics and get help. And because you’re a therapist, I’m guessing your pretty keen on helping people.

Writing informative blog posts and promoting them on Pinterest means you can help a lot of people, and not just those you see in your office. And boosting the traffic to your site will mean the people who are local to you can find you more easily in Google and get them in your office. SEO win!

Another pretty cool aspect of Pinterest is that it makes your entire audience your potential marketing team. If you’re creating killer looking pins and have the content on your blog to back it up, others will repin it. And as more people see it. More can repin it, and the cycle goes on and on.

Related: Why Your Private Practice NEEDS to be on Pinterest

Ok, so let’s get into the actionable stuff.

Below, I’ve laid out some of the steps you can take to get your Pinterest profile working more for you and driving traffic to your private practice website/blog. To help you run through it, I’ve created a handy checklist you can reference.

Download your free checklist here:
Download the free checklist and start driving traffic with Pinterest

Getting Started: Start a Pinterest Business Account or Convert Your Personal Account

To make the most out of using Pinterest to drive traffic to your therapy website, you’re going to want to make sure you’re using a Pinterest business account.

There are some awesome benefits to creating a Pinterest business account. One of the best reasons is that you’ll get to use Pinterst Analytics. This will help you learn which pins are getting the most repins and clicks as well as track the performance of your profile and website content.

A business account will also give you access to rich pins, which we’ll discuss more in depth below.

I should mention that all these benefits are FREE. BONUS!

Now, if you already have a personal Pinterest account that you’ve been growing in followers for a time, don’t worry, you don’t need to create a new account (unless of course you want a totally separate account for your private practice). With just a couple clicks you can convert it to a business account.

Steps To Create A Pinterest Business Account

1. Go to the Pinterest for Business homepage and get started.

If you want to start a new account just for your private practice, you’ll click on the “Join as a business” button.

Create a Pinterest business account our convert your current one

Already have a Pinterest account you’ve been using that you’d like to continue using for your private practice? Follow these steps to convert to a business account.

2. Confirm Your Website

In order for Pintersdt to start providing analytics, you’ll need to confirm your website.

Pinterest provides instructions for two ways of doing it here.

The way you choose to do it really involves what you’re comfortable with as far as making edits to your code. I recommend the second method shown and using your host account’s file manager to upload the Pinterest file to root directory of your website.

You’re all set! Give it a day or so and you’ll start seeing some numbers in the Analytics section, which you can find in the top navigation next to the Pinterest logo.

Next: Set Up Rich Pins

Rich pins are a way for Pinterest to provide some extra information about your website along with pins that link to your pages and posts. A bold title, website name and favicon all appear with your pin to let pinners know more about who they’re repinning. I bet you’ve seen them before, but here’s an example of a rich pin I created for this post: Setting up rich pins for your therapy website

You can see the extra info that Pinterest provides to users when they see this pin. It let’s people know the name of my site as well as the title of the blog post in nice large text. It also provides a link underneath to my Pinterest profile so people can easily follow me there.

Rich pins can have a huge impact on the amount of repins and views your profile receives. We like that!

So how does one set Rich Pins? Just follow the steps below.

Setting Up Rich Pins in WordPress

1. If you haven’t already been using the Yoast SEO plugin (I HIGHLY recommend this plugin) go ahead and install it. Then Go to SEO > Social > Facebook, and check the box that says “Enable Open Graph meta data”.

Use Yoast SEO to set up rich pins

Enable open graph in Yoast SEO

2. Hop on over to the Rich Pin Validator. Copy and paste a link to any of your blog posts and click “Validate”

Validate your therapy blog for rich pins to appear

3. Once it’s done, you’ll get a message saying your pin has been validated along with the info that Pinterest is seeing for your blog post.

Rich pins validated

Once that’s all set up, you’re ready to start really promoting your therapy website on Pinterest! Let’s keep going 🙂

Need more detail? Check out this post: How To Set Up Pinterest Rich Pins for Your Private Practice Website

The Steps to Promote Your Therapy Blog on Pinterest

I’ve found that the best way to drive traffic from Pinterest to my own website is with blog posts.

A pin with a single, focused topic that will help people is much more engaging than a generic pin about your therapy website. You can certainly create and promote those too, but blogs are your best bet for a long-term strategy to get people to your website.

So here are the steps that I follow to promote my own blogs on Pinterest:

Step 1 – Write the Best Darn Blog Post You Can, of Course!

This should be a given. If your blogs are not providing high value and serving your readers, they will bounce off the site very quickly.

Spend some time reading blogs about the art of blogging and creating content that readers will love and want to share. To get you started, I created a board to collect some of my favorite blogging articles and resources.

Don’t know what to write about? Check out this post: Blogging for Therapists: How to Find Your Niche

Step 2 – Brainstorm Titles

After I write a blog I’ll spend some time brainstorming my titles.

I often have a title in mind when I begin a blog, but sometimes by the end of writing the direction of it may have changed.

So I’ll take a step back and write out a few, attention-grabbing titles I think would work. I keep in mind that this title will appear both on my blog and on my Pinterest pin, so I want it to be catchy and intriguing enough that someone would want to click and read it.

Step 3 – Gather Some Stock Photos

This step is kinda optional. You don’t NEED photos in your pins.

You can search for some photos that will work for your pin and blog post topic.

I like to have a few to work with. My goal is to create about 5 or 6 pins for each blog post I write.

The reason being that different people will see the pins at different times. So I can spread these pins out over time to increase the potential of repins and people clicking over to my blog.

I most often use unsplash.com or pexels.com for photos, because it’s free. I’ve also used Shutterstock in the past, which has photos starting at $29 for 2.

If you search Google or Pinterest enough, you can find tons of cheap or free options for photos.

Step 4 – Design Your Pin Using Photoshop or a Free App, like Canva

Using Photoshop to Create Pins

Now comes the fun part. At least for me.

My background is in web design so it’s the visual stuff that I enjoy the most.

Personally, I use Photoshop for all my pin designs. Photoshop is the most popular photo-editing and design application out there. I recommend Photoshop, but it is definitely expensive, especially if design is not your main thing. You could do just fine with Photoshop Elements, which is the $99 beginner version, which has much of the functionality you’d use for creating graphics for your blog and pins.

According to entrepreneur.com, the best size for a Pinterest pin uses a ratio of 2:3 or 1:3.5 and a minimum width of 600 pixels. So, for example:

  • A 2:3 aspect ratio could be 600 pixels wide by 900 pixels tall
  • A 1:3.5 aspect ratio could be 600 pixels wide by 2,100 pixels tall

There are tons of great tutorials on adobe.com to get your feet wet with Photoshop.

Using Canva to Create Pins

You can use Canva to create free pins for your therapis blog

I try my best to offer free solutions when I can, and for pin design, Canva is one of them. Canva is a relatively new website/app that is really quite awesome.

I’d seen the name a lot so I tried it out a few months ago and I love it as a free option for cool graphics.

They give you tons of pre-designed templates to choose from, and not just Pinterest pins. You can create Facebook covers, flyers, banners or pretty much anything. You can change the colors and text to your liking and then download your design as an image. And it’s totally free as long as you don’t use any of their premium design elements or stock photos.

So check out Canva.com or download the iPad app here.

Step 5 – Post your pin

Ok, so we’ve done all this work and we have our beautiful pin designed and saved, so it’s time to launch it into the Pinterest atmosphere and get people coming to our blog. Yahoo!

Navigate to your profile page on Pinterest and click on the link that lets you view all your pins.

Pinterest for Therapists

In the top left corner ther will be a big plus sign “+”, click that to add your pin. Choose “Your Device” and navigate to the pin image file that you want to upload.

Under the image, give it a great description that is detailed and contains some of the keywords that your target audience would be searching for. According to the Pinterest Best Practice Guide:

Every Pin should have a description that gives context. The best descriptions are positive, helping people imagine what they might do with the Pin while also providing extra information.

Pinterest also recommeds you be very specific and DON’T use hashtags. The overall sentiment on Pinterest is a positive one, so you want to help people. Give them something to do (view your blog) and provide them with great value.

If you have a great post about coping with anxiety, put yourself in the place of someone in the thick of it. What types of things would they want someone to say to them? Be warm and helpful and they will click through to your great content.

using pinterest to promote your private practice

So your pin is uploaded, description is written. Click on the board that you want it appear in and it will be posted. You can’t add the link to your blog just yet, so you’ll have to view the pin you just created and edit it via the pencil/edit button. Paste the link to your corresponding blog post in the “website” field and click save and you’re DONE!

Some Other Tips & Things to Consider

  • Make sure to put a link to your website in your Pinterest profile
  • Add your location to your profile to help local clients find you
  • Follow other therapists or practitioners similar to you for ideas and to pin a variety of content

Helpul Resources

Download your free checklist:

Well, there you have it. To help you run through these steps and get your Pinterest profile working for you, I created a handy checklist you can use for reference, just click here to get your hands on it.

Download the free checklist and start driving traffic with Pinterest