Your website exists to convert visitors into clients. But if your private practice website isn’t doing its job, what can you do to begin getting to work for you?

 

In this article I’ll break down 5 reasons why your private practice website may not be getting you the conversions you desire. Let’s begin!

1: Your Website Doesn’t Look Trustworthy

Your website represents your private practice.

It’s one of the first places people will look to judge whether you’re the therapist for them.

And when your website looks like it was built in the 90’s or frustrates the user, they will judge the legitimacy of your business.

How many times have you searched for a service online and landed on a businesses website that was poorly created, lacked info and was hard to use?

Then you breathe a sigh of relief when you come to the next company that has a professional website, is easy to use and just makes you feel like they know what they’re doing because of that…

You’ll probably choose the business whose website left you feeling good rather than frustrated, right?

If you want to see more clients choose you because of what they saw on your website, you’ve got to invest either some time or money into making it look professional.

Related Post: 5 Ways Your Private Practice Website is Making You Look Unprofessional

2: You’ve Made It Too Complicated

Have you ever gone into a store and had a question about a product?

But maybe it’s a large store and there’s no one around to help you.

Or maybe it’s a busy store, it’s cluttered and there’s a so much going on you can’t even begin to find someone who can help you with your question.

You hang out a bit with that “I need help” look on your face just hoping someone will come by and ask what they can do for you.

This is what it’s like for your potential clients if your website is too busy.

If there isn’t a clear path on your website to let users know the next step you want them to take, they’re probably getting frustrated and leaving your website.

Find ways to simplify your website and give clear calls to action to help increase your conversions.

3: Potential Therapy Clients Aren’t Sure You Can Help Them With Their Challenge

Another reason why your private practice website may not be converting may come down a content issue.

Do you have content on your website that your ideal clients are looking for?

Are you breaking down your services into informational pages that showcase your expertise and give them idea of what life can look like after they work with you?

Or do you just have a bulleted list of topics/issues you can help your clients with.

I truly believe that you’re doing amazing work and the world is a better place because of your service.

But when someone is pain and they land on their website, all they want to know is “can this person help me?”

And if you don’t have much information that helps them feel confident in your abilities then why would they choose to work with you?

Put yourself in their shoes and expound upon the amazing work you do with your clients.

When you view your website as a way to serve your clients BEFORE they’re even your clients, you begin to create helpful content that will help you stand out amongst other therapists.

Related Post: How one therapist used specialty pages to land on page one of Google.

4: You Haven’t Given Them A Chance to Convert

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If you don’t give your website visitors a chance to convert, well then, they probably won’t convert!

Make sure that you do your best to make it as easy as possible for people to take the next step with you.

Is your contact information easy to find? Is it consistently placed in the same spot on every page, such as a footer or header bar?

Are you using calls to action that are clear and tell your visitor what they should do next?

You’ll want to include calls to action on each page to make sure you lead them down the path toward that conversion.

And make sure they stand out.

A simple text link in the middle or end of a page of content may get lost.

Try and make your calls to action stand out from your content and give the page an anchor for your visitor to gravitate toward.

5: Your Private Practice Website Just Doesn’t Work

If your website is riddled with broken links and functionality issues, you’re going to drive people away quickly.

Ain’t nobody got time for that!

Trying to use a website that doesn’t work is extremely frustrating in this fast-paced, convenience-addicted world of ours.

If you know you have issues with your website that may be causing your visitors to get annoyed and bounce off, address them asap.

Another big issue on this subject is whether your website is responsive or not.

Are you visitors able to navigate and easily use your website on a mobile device?

This is becoming increasingly important and Google will reward websites with a mobile-friendly version with a higher rank than those without.

Your great content and great work will mean nothing if people simply cannot use your website.

Conclusion

Increasing conversions of your website can be a tricky, ongoing process.

If you’re feeling like your website is not working to get clients in the door of your private practice, pay attention to the reasons above and begin brainstorming some ways to address anything you think may be the cause.

Change may not happen overnight, but as you plug the holes in your website, over time your website will be working more and more effectively for you and doing what it was designed to do… get you clients!

Have you ever heard someone say how you need a ‘marketing funnel’ in your private practice? If you’re confused as to what that means, please read on.

Have you ever heard someone say how you need a ‘marketing funnel’ in your private practice? If you’re confused as to what that means, please read on. In this article I’ll break down what it means to have a private practice marketing funnel and how it can be applied to your business.

In this article I’ll break down what it means to have a private practice marketing funnel and how it can be applied to your business.

The Private Practice Marketing Funnel Explained

When someone talks about having a marketing funnel, they’re actually referring to a series of steps a website visitor would take to go from a general prospect to becoming your next client.

For example, someone who doesn’t know you may land on your website for the first time.

Then, perhaps they join your email list and receive some more information from you.

They get to know you over time and get more familiar with you.

Then they click a link in an email and schedule that first session with you.

That’s it! That’s what a marketing funnel may look like in a private practice.

To help you visualize, here’s a great depiction of a marketing funnel:

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Source: Vendasta

Let’s break this down a bit, shall we?

Lead Attraction: Increasing Traffic Made Up Of Potential Clients

The first phase of any marketing funnel in your private practice starts with attracting new potential clients, or leads.

These are folks that are new to your world.

They may be doing a bit of research for a therapist so they visit your website and view your content in an attempt to learn more about what you do and if you can help them.

So your first step in creating a marketing funnel is to provide content that serves your ideal client.

This could be in the form of relevant blog posts on topics your ideal clients are concerned about.

It could also be an informational page on your website that focuses on your areas of expertise.

Whatever it is, it should be jam-packed with helpful info that speaks to the type of client you want to attract, as that’s your best way of growing more traffic from those most likely to work with you.

This type of content can help you grow your SEO potential too, which can increase traffic to your private practice website over time.

So, once all that traffic shows up to your website, then what?

Let’s continue.

Lead Engagement: Turning Traffic into New Leads

Ok, so you’ve got some great content on your therapy website and people are showing up to read it.

The next step is to give your visitors a chance to go a little deeper with you and receive even more value from you.

This is where you ask them for their email address in exchange for some high-value content related to what they’ve already read on your website or something you know would really benefit your clients.

What this does is it allows people to put their hand up and say they want to learn more from you.

It serves your potential client in a deeper way.

On your end, it gives you a chance to follow up with them later via email.

Think of some extra content you can create that would help a potential client solve a specific problem.

It could be a PDF guide or maybe a link to an instructional video on YouTube.

This is what people call a “lead magnet”. You may have heard the term.

Most email service providers, like Mailchimp, allow you to create a form you can paste into a page on your website where people can put in their name and email address.

Then, once they sign up, you can send them the free special content.

Here’s an example from another CMTW blog post:

private practice marketing funnel optimized

Once someone fills that form out, they’ll get an email confirming their subscription and giving them a link to download their free checklist.

Onto the next phase!

Lead Nurturing: Staying Connected to Potential Clients and Converting Them Into Paying Ones

Ok, so someone has visited your website and decided they’d like more from you so they join your email list, then what?

Well, the first step is to welcome the new lead (potential client) to your email list and deliver the content you promised.

If it’s a PDF, you’ll have your email service provider send out a link to the file so they can download it.

Your next goal is to stay connected to this person so they not only get to know you but – if they’re your ideal client – educate them on how you are uniquely qualified to help them overcome their challenges.

They showed enough interest in your work that they gave you their email address so let’s not take that lightly. You want to serve them well!

You’ll want to continue to provide them with great content on a regular basis to keep your practice top of mind as they’re deciding whether to work with you or not.

A great way to do this is to create a sequence of emails that continues to provide valuable content.

This would be your “welcome series” or “onboarding” email sequence.

Here’s some ideas of the types of emails you can send them, starting with delivering your lead magnet:

  1. Welcome them to your email list and give them the link to your PDF download or other free content you promised
  2. Send an “about me” email that tells your story and how/why you help your clients get results in their lives
  3. Expand upon the free content by diving deep into how they can apply it to their situation
  4. Send an email that showcases your best blog posts
  5. Use your most-visited blog post as content for an email
  6. Send an email that reminds them of the services you offer

The number of emails you send is up to you. I’d recommend not overwhelming the recipient with too many emails though.

Space them out a bit and give more time in between emails as time goes on.

What’s great about this method is that you can send 6 emails over the course of 3 months, which allows you to serve your ideal client, educate them on your services and get to know you on a deeper level.

Going Forward: What To Do With Your Email List

Beyond sending an onboarding or welcome series of emails to your email list you’ll want to keep in touch with them consistently over time.

If you’ve got upcoming workshops, classes or webinars that you’re offering, you can send an email to your list to let them know.

Maybe there’s a book that you’ve seen greatly impact your clients’ lives. You can write an email about it and send them the link.

Or maybe you’ve found or created other great resources that may help your clients. Share that with your email list.

If you’re writing blog posts on a regular basis, you can use that as a way to send new and relevant content to your email list.

If you’re on the CMTW email list, you’ll often get emails that let you know about new articles to help you with your private practice website.

This approach is great because you don’t have to come up with ideas for both blog posts AND emails to send.

Remember: your services and content CAN help people. Use your email list as way to generously give to your ideal client.

Do this and you’ll hopefully remain top of mind so that when they’re ready to start therapy, you’ll be the one they call.

Conclusion

Creating a marketing funnel for your private practice can be a great way to serve your ideal client beyond just visiting your website.

To recap, there are three main steps to any marketing funnel:

  1. Lead Attraction is where you get traffic to your website by writing great content aimed at your ideal client
  2. Lead Engagement is where you offer that traffic some extra valuable content, such as a PDF
  3. Lead Nurturing is where you continue to connect with your potential clients by sending them relevant emails

Since many people may not reach out to you the first time they visit your website, having them go through these steps is a great way to stay connected.

You can use a marketing funnel in your private practice to serve your potential clients so that when they ARE ready to begin therapy, they’ll be able to respond to your emails and get started right away.

A quest post by Katie May

So you have an idea for an awesome group and you just KNOW it’s going to benefit the clients that you serve. In fact, a few of them may have even mentioned that they wish something like it already exists.

A quest post by Katie May So you have an idea for an awesome group and you just KNOW it’s going to benefit the clients that you serve. In fact, a few of them may have even mentioned that they wish something like it already exists.

You create a flyer, open enrollment AND… Crickets.

Why does it feel so hard to fill a group when you know your clients will benefit from it (and they’ve even expressed interest and excitement?)

It’s because group enrollment actually starts way before you open the doors. There’s pre-launch work that needs to be done.

And what’s cool about this is that you actually get to offer a LOT of value and content to help your local community before they even connect with you for a group screening.

Step 0: Your Therapy Group Pre-Launch

I like to think of the pre-launch as “step 0.” It’s what prospective clients can start to do to help themselves before they decide they know, like and trust you enough to reach out for help.

Think about it… that first step of asking for help (or admitting you need help) can be the hardest one.

When you follow a process that moves your prospective clients through a journey, you’re moving the relationship with them from complete strangers to one where you position yourself as the go-to expert that they NEED to see.

You’ll want to give yourself about eight weeks prior to the start of your group to set yourself up for full group success.

This gives you enough time to be able to effectively market, but also to recognize that life happens and that work, family and/or sickness can get in the way.

You want to plan for hiccups so that you’re not scrambling at the last minute to fill those last few seats.

Start by really fleshing out your ideal group client, even if you think you already know them.

Understand what their pain points are and what relief they are looking for by reaching out to you. This should be easy for you if you work with this specific type of client in your practice already.

You’ve likely fielded tons of calls, had tons of intake sessions and serve multiple clients per week on this very issue that you can use as your “market research.”

Make a List of Potential Group Clients

Make a list of clients that you already see that could be a good fit for your group. You may even want to think about “pre-selling” them. This is easy peasy!

As you wrap up a session (or in an email between sessions) you can simply say, “Hey, I’m thinking about running a group for women with anxiety in the next few months. If I run it, would you be interested?”

This will give you a good idea of the potential for your group and whether clients like yours will be interested in it.

You want to be sure that those who are interested have a place to get more information. Create a page on your website that is fully dedicated to your group.

Be sure to talk about who it’s for, what this person experiences and have specific and bullet-pointed outcomes that this person will achieve when they join your group.

You don’t even need to have a specific date or time for group yet.

Create a Contact Form For People Interested in Your Group

The most important part of this group page is having a contact form for those who are interested to fill out their name, email address and phone number.

This will allow you to follow up with them further in the launch process to share more about the group and invite them to connect with you.

Create a flyer using the same information you used on your group page.

Be mindful to not overcrowd the flyer with details and understand that the goal of the flyer is to drive people to your group page to complete a contact form so you can gather their information for further use.

Share this flyer in your waiting room and with any colleagues who support a similar population.

Formulate Your Therapy Group Goals

Finally, start to formulate some really concrete goals for your group.

How many clients would you like to ideally have signed up to start the group? What is the minimum amount of income you’d like to make to run the group successfully?

When you can set clear goals to know exactly what you’re working towards, it will motivate you and guide you in the whole group filling process.

Write down your goals and really visualize that full and profitable group every single day.

Once your ideal client and group goals are clear, the rest becomes a numbers game.

It’s about driving targeted traffic to your group web page and using a phone conversation to screen members to enroll those who are a perfect fit.

For more information on how to market and fill your group once you’re clear on the who and what, visit ​www.becomeagroupguru.com​ and watch the free webinar to Fill Your Therapy Group in 6 weeks.

​Stop wishing and waiting to get enough clients interested all at once and learn the 3 step process for creating group clients on demand with a fool-proof marketing process that brings group members to you in 6 weeks or less.

KKM Profile Pic 1

About Katie

Katie helps therapists market, fill and run group programs so that they can make a massive positive impact on the world (and their bank account) at the same time.

Visit www.becomeagroupguru.com to learn the fastest and most effective way to go from zero to full group, even if you hate marketing and you have no idea where to start.

Blogging can be one of the best ways to boost traffic to your private practice website. But simply putting a post on your website isn’t enough to ensure people actually read it. So what can you do?

Blogging can be one of the best ways to boost traffic to your private practice website. But simply putting a post on your website isn’t enough to ensure people actually read it. So what can you do? In this article we’ll go over five ways you can boost your traffic with blogging while ensuring that visitors stick around and actually read your posts.

In this article we’ll go over five ways you can boost your traffic with blogging while ensuring that visitors stick around and actually read your posts.

1: Write Content Your Ideal Clients Actually Want To Read

5 ways to get more readers therapy blog 1

The first step in increasing your blog readership is to write posts that actually serve your ideal clients.

Your blog should not be a repository of “deep thoughts” or vague reflections.

I certainly encourage you to use your experiences and reflections to inspire your blog posts.

But a blog post titled “My Morning Hike” will get faaaaaar less views than one titled “How A Simple Walk Can Help You Set Goals and Decrease Anxiety About The New Year.”

When we use vague titles and long ramblings, it’s extremely unclear to the reader what’s actually in it for them.

Starting with your headline, you give your website visitors a reason to read each blog post.

Don’t know where to begin?

Start by thinking about why clients come to you.

Make a list of the challenges their facing and the topics you’ve been discussing in your sessions.

Then write about it!

Think of your blog as a way of serving your current clients as well as website visitors that may not even become your clients.

Over time, this will help increase connection with your readers, foster a positive perception of you and your practice, highlight your expertise and hopefully turn into more clients.

2: Be Consistent When Publishing New Blog Posts on Your Private Practice Website

more readers therapist blogging counseling calendar

Google loves seeing fresh content on your private practice website.

When you consistently add new blog posts, this lets Google know that your website is growing.

It says, “Now here’s a website that is constantly growing in resources. I like that!”

Plus, the more you write, the more words are on your website.

This means that your chances for ranking for new keywords is increasing constantly, so your ability to rank higher in Google for various phrases goes up and up over time.

When we first launched my wife’s website back in 2011, we saw her traffic double after she began blogging.

She added one new blog post each week for a few months.

And she didn’t even use social media to share the posts!

So, if you want to increase traffic to your blog, find a schedule that works for you and stick to it.

For tips on how to maintain a consistent blogging schedule, check out this post.

3: Use Social Media To Drive More Traffic to Your Blog Posts

5 ways to get more blog readers therapist marketing social media

If your clients don’t know your blog post exists, how will they ever read it?

Plus, your blog posts may or may not be ranking well in Google, making it hard to even find some of that great content you’ve been working on.

So, another way you can get your blog posts in front of potential clients is to use social media.

When you use social media to create a following, it’s another way to get your content in front of people.

And if people are liking your private practice Facebook page or following you on Pinterest, then they’ve already expressed some interest in what you’re doing.

This makes them more likely to read your posts when they show up in their feed.

Heck, even if it’s your friends and family that see your blog posts on Facebook, you never know who will read it, share it and get it in front of your next client.

My favorite social network for driving traffic is DEFINITELY Pinterest.

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Did you know that Pinterest is the second largest driver of traffic, second only to Facebook?

Because of its traffic-building potential and nature of finding helpful articles on the platform, I believe it can be a powerful marketing tool for any therapist with a blog.

Related article: Why Your Private Practice Needs To Be On Pinterest.

But no matter what platform you love to use, social media is a great way to take your blog post a bit further and drive a little more traffic to it.

Some tips for using social media to promote your blog posts:

  • If you’re just starting out, choose ONE network and learn how to use it effectively before adding another
  • Be consistent. Just like how you should frequently publish new blog posts on your website, you should frequently be sharing on social media
  • Try and balance 1 post about your business to every 4 posts that are not promotional, such as quotes and helpful articles from others
  • Use Google Analytics to check in from time to time and see which platform is bringing in the most traffic and then focus on that platform to drive even more traffic

4: Use Email Marketing to Let People Know When You’ve Published a New Post

5 ways to get more blog readers therapists email marketing

Just like social media above, using email marketing is a great way to send your blog posts to potential clients who have already expressed interest in your work.

One of the first questions I hear from people starting out with email marketing is “what do I say to people on my email list?”

Letting people on your email list know that you’ve published a new blog post is a great way to keep in touch with your list.

Once your blog post is published, you can write an email summarizing it and include the link back to your website.

I encourage you to link to your website, rather than just send the blog post in an email.

This way, people can visit other pages on your website if they want to – continually learning more about your services – and hopefully lead to scheduling a session with you.

Your email list should be filled with people who have already enjoyed your content enough to even give you their email address… so this audience is really the best target for reading your blog posts.

When they continue to get helpful and insightful articles a couple times a month, it warms them up to you, creates trust and helps remind them that you can help them.

You never know when someone will respond to one of those emails asking when they can schedule their next session!

5: Include Images in Your Blog Posts

private practice blogging tips

So here is a stat that is pretty crazy:

Blog articles with images get 94% more views. (source)

94%!! Wow!

In our fast-paced world, photos help get our attention and drive engagement.

If you want to increase the amount of views your blog posts get, be sure to include at least one photo with each one.

This will help your posts stand out, especially when shared on social media.

Including images can also help you optimize your post better for search engines.

To learn more about how to optimize images for SEO, click here.

Conclusion

If you’re wondering why more people aren’t reading your blog posts, I encourage to give the five tips above a shot.

Test it out over time and see if your traffic is increasing.

Remember, just publishing blog posts is not always enough to increase your traffic.

You just may need to give people a reminder that your new blog posts exist. The more chances people get to hear about your post, the more clicks over to your website there will be.

And the best part about all the tips above is that they’re totally free for you to try!

A guest post by Ili Rivera Walter, PhD

By now, I am sure you know that other than you, your website is your number one networking partner in attracting potential therapy clients. What you may not know, however, is that your website is the perfect place to communicate your personality, and what I call your “personal brand.”

A guest post by Ili Rivera Walter, PhD By now, I am sure you know that other than you, your website is your number one networking partner in attracting potential therapy clients. What you may not know, however, is that your website is the perfect place to communicate your personality, and what I call your “personal brand.”

Using your website as the home of your personal brand gives clients a refreshing experience. When your online home showcases your brand, visitors do not encounter another humdrum therapy website, and as a result, they are able to better determine if what you offer is what they need.

So, what exactly is your personal brand?

Your personal brand is who you are translated into words, colors, and images that reflect who you serve and what you want.

Today, I am sharing with you the method that I teach therapists for finding and communicating their personal brand with words. I call it the “soul-story method.”

1: Soul (The Reflection Stage)

Getting in touch with your soul means getting in touch with your humanity. When you understand who you are, you are able to consistently connect with therapy clients, and anyone, from your personhood. This is the first step in social connection, as well as establishing a flowing client and referral base.

As a therapist, you are well-trained in empathic communication, listening, and presence. While connecting with clients online may not come easy to you, this is (most likely) not because you don’t have the skills for fostering connection.

The difficulty for many therapists is found in the frame and language that exists for building their businesses–words like “marketing,” “sales,” “conversion,” “profit.”

What might shift for you if, for example, you began to reframe business growth as based on “learning,” “curiosity,” “questioning,” “serving,” and of course, “connecting”?

The soul section of the soul-story method is simple. Answer the questions:

  • What awakens your soul?
  • What have you observed from your work, and/or its results, that inspires you?

Answering these questions requires a process of reflection that results in identifying what moves you. Here is a list of sample questions to guide you:

What awakens your soul?

  • During what activities are you most present?
  • What were you doing the last time you laughed with surprising joy?
  • What nurtures you?
  • How do you express your creativity?
  • In what ways do you take care of your soul?

What have you observed from your work, and/or its results, that inspires you?

  • Think of a recent time when you felt honored to hear a client’s story during therapy. Describe your experience.
  • When has a client expressed gratitude for your work?
    • What was the client’s presenting problem?
    • What change occurred?
    • How did you feel when he/she expressed gratitude?
  • What therapy work do you LOVE?

The soul section connects your personal inspiration with your professional inspiration, because these, together, create your personal brand. They get to the heart of what you do, and why you do it.

2: Story (The Writing Stage)

Explaining her process for public speaking, Dr. Debra Campbell (2017) says, “The material had to feel utterly authentic to me, streamed live from my soul, and I had to own it one hundred per cent in the telling.”

During the story stage, you “own” the telling of your authenticity. You express what you learned in the soul section with a message that reverberates in clients’ minds.

A Quick Story

When I first visited Daniel Fava’s website, the main thing that stood out to me, and the only thing I remember from that first website visit, is that Daniel is an INFJ (Myer’s-Briggs Type Indicator personality type).

It is the last bullet point on his About page. Why did this seemingly insignificant detail–unrelated to websites–stick with me? Well, I use the MBTI as a coaching tool with my therapist clients, I speak “MBTI” language, and my husband is an INFJ.

I happen to know that INFJ’s comprise less than 1.5% of the population. This told me more about him, and what I most likely would experience working with him, than anything he says on his site about his process for creating therapist websites.

Daniel couldn’t have known what detail on his site would reach me. He, however, understood that by sharing his personality (literally!), the likelihood was that he would make a heart-connection with his readers.

Marketing communication, like all interpersonal communication, starts with a heart check. Who’s the person you want to establish or deepen your connection with? Why is it important? What’s at stake? Why does what you want to say matter to them? –Donald Miller

How to tell your story

Boundaries

All compelling stories have boundaries. In fiction, the boundaries are determined by the story arc; in poetry, by the pattern.

For therapists, the boundaries are determined, to a large degree, by our ethical and legal commitments. Let’s take a minute to establish the boundaries of your soul story.

I recently received a question from a therapist who is developing a niche, and considering blogging. She asked:

What’s the boundary of personally disclosing on a professional blog? My personal life is what led me to focus on [her niche], which is what my practice will address. I don’t normally self disclose during sessions, but I’m wondering if its a different ball game with blogging.

I responded to this therapist with what I believe about storytelling (side note: storytelling is different from self-disclosure): Clients want to know that you understand them. There is no better way to communicate understanding than to share a similar struggle, if it has led you to your niche.

How to share a struggle

Whether you’re writing a blog post, your website, or a social media post, the sweet spot, for you and potential clients, is in revealing your personality, but not your personal process. My guide for this is Brené Brown’s tip: “Share what is vulnerable, not what is intimate.” Also, ensure that the motivation for the telling is to connect with potential therapy clients from your professional identity.

How to craft your story

I’ve found the following guidelines helpful when writing business content:

1 | Mention who you serve, and why you serve them

For significant content–videos, blog posts, podcast episodes, and so forth, make sure that it solves a problem for your potential or existing clients, and/or that you communicate your experience and passion.

2 | Use “I”

If you are solo practitioner, a group practice owner who uses independently contracted therapists, or a business owner at the center of your brand, use “I” when referring to your business, rather than “we.” “I” reflects vulnerability and ownership, while “we” can be confusing when one person is the face of the business.

3 | Use “You”

Speak directly to your potential therapy clients, when your goal is to teach, or you are inviting action. In general, speak directly to them as much as possible. Your business is about them, and connecting with them, and ultimately, this is the role of your story.

What is your story?

Your story is your business story, but it is also your personal story. You’ve worked hard, struggled, succeeded, learned, and you bring all of that into every therapy session. Your clients and potential clients should know your passion and determination.

In an effort to guide you through the process of writing your story, I am listing three questions that will lead to you identifying the essentials of your story. I’ve also answered each question with my story, in order to provide an example:

  • What brought you to this point in your career, and this business?

I changed my business model (from private practice to online counseling/coaching) after becoming a mom. I needed more flexibility, and I wanted to design work that met my personal needs for my new life stage.

What events have led you to be where you are right now? Invite your potential clients into this part of your story.

  • Why do you serve the clients you serve?

When I was transitioning professionally, I could not find a community that would help me navigate the personal and career changes required. I decided to focus my expertise on supporting therapists in creating careers that enrich their life.

  • What vision are you creating, one session at a time?

I am creating a community of therapists who feel and work refreshed, by designing intentional work. I am determined to blast burnout out of the mental health field!

How to use your story

Once you’ve completed your soul story, circle words that you use regularly in conversation. Star or highlight words that communicate your heart for your work. These words will be the foundation of your personal brand. Use them repeatedly when you post on social media, as well as on your website and sales copy.

Once you are intimately familiar with your soul story, it will naturally appear in your writing. In the meantime, glance at it anytime you write content for your private practice.

I recommend going through the soul-story method with pen and paper. If you want to clarify your personal brand, and craft your soul-story, download your free soul-story method guide, here: bit.ly/soulstoryguide. It includes all of the questions listed in this post, along with space for writing.

 


Ili Walter

Ili Rivera Walter, PhD is an intentional career coach and wellness warrior for mental health professionals. She is a LMFT in the states of Florida and Pennsylvania, as well as an AAMFT-Approved Supervisor. Ili is the founder and facilitator of The Refreshed Therapist Network, a community of therapists creating innovative careers that prevent burnout and enhance wellbeing. Learn more about Ili at www.familytherapybasics.com.

When search engines crawl through your content, one of the first indicators as to what the page is about is the URL. You can use the URL of each page and blog post on your private practice website to boost your SEO game.

In this article, we’ll talk about 5 ways to optimize URLs for SEO.

When search engines crawl through your content, one of the first indicators as to what the page is about is the URL. You can use the URL of each page and blog post on your private practice website to boost your SEO game. In this article, we’ll talk about 5 ways to optimize URLs for SEO.

1: Optimize for Humans, First

Google is VERY smart.

Gone are the days of just slapping keywords in your content and ranking on page 1.

Because Google wants to show the BEST content for a user’s search, you have to write for humans, not for Google.

Make your URLs as easy to read as possible.

This way, when someone sees a URL, they’ll have a clear understanding of what they’ll find by clicking on it.

Instead of URL like this: http://www.mywebsite.com/home/post?ID=128

You want something like this: http://www.mywebsite.com/10-ways-to-naturally-battle-depression

Which link would YOU rather click on?

2: Place Your Keywords in the URL

This one is pretty straight forward.

Decide what someone would type into Google to find the content you’re creating and place those keywords in the URL.

As I mentioned in this post’s intro, the URL is one of the first places Google will look to indicate what the page is about.

Research has also shown evidence of something called “domain bias”.

This means that users will often judge content based on whether they believe a domain to be worth a click based on the URL.

Putting your keywords in the URL will help users know exactly what they’ll get from clicking your link in search engines.

3: Keep URLs short, If Possible

This one is about usability, more than the technical side of Google.

Going back to tip #1 in this post, you want your URLs to be easily read and understood by humans.

A shorter URL will be much easier to read, easier to remember, easier to copy and past and can be understood more quickly than a super long URL.

There’s not hard and fast rule here, but I’d try and keep it as short as possible and well under 100 characters.

4: Separate Words with Hyphens & Underscores

You can break up the words in your URLs by separating them with hyphens or underscores.

Sometimes, when you leave a space in your URL, it will render as %20, which just looks weird and detracts from the keywords I know you’re putting in your URL.

Most content management systems, like WordPress take care of this automatically, but it’s worth a mention.

5: Keep URLs Consistent with Page Titles, If Possible

To create a consistent user experience and re-iterate the page content, try and match the words in the URL with the words of your page title.

If you have a super long title for a blog post (10 Ways To Survive Family Dysfunction During The Holidays… Without Drinking), it doesn’t mean that it has to be word for word.

But you do want some consistency that will let the user know what they’ll find by clicking the link and then be reassured when they see the title when they land on the page.

Something like http://mywebsite.com/survive-family-dysfunction-during-holidays would totally work here.

This will also help when you share the link on social media.

Your followers will see the title of the page and the matching URL close by, giving them confidence to click.

Wrapping UP

I hope you’ve found these five tips useful as you optimize your private practice website for search engines.

SEO can be a fickle beast, but if you keep tips like the above in mind while you consistently create content, you’ll see positive movement over time.

If you’d like to learn what Google finds most important and how to SEO your private practice website, check out my mini-course, A Little Course About SEO.

Want To Learn More About SEO?

Check out my mini-training, A Little Course About SEO:

Publishing videos on your blog regularly can be a great way to connect with potential clients. But is there a benefit or drawback to vlogging (video blogging)?

In this article we’ll explore the pros and cons of vlogging and help you discover if video marketing is right for you.

Is there a benefit or drawback to vlogging (video blogging)? In this article we’ll explore the pros and cons of vlogging and help you discover if video marketing is right for you.

The Benefits of Video Blogging

The main benefits of vlogging all come down to building that “know, like and trust” factor with your audience.

When someone feels like they know you, like you and trust you, they’ll be much easier to convert into a paying client.

Know

There’s just something about video that allows you to connect with people.

They get to see your face, look into your eyes and hear your voice.

If you’re consistently creating video content for your blog, over time, your viewers will begin to feel like they know you.

You can even share short stories from your own life that relate to the topic you’re discussing, or just share a little about what’s going on in your world.

This is much easier in a video format versus a written format, where people would probably just skip over such details.

By the time your potential client reaches out to schedule an appointment, they’ll already feel like they know you, making it much easier to transition into a clinical relationship.

Like

It’s kinda hard to hide your personality on video.

Yeah, it may be very uncomfortable when you first start doing videos.

Which may make it difficult to let your personality come through.

But as time goes on, the anxiety will fall and your personality will begin to rise.

At least that’s what’s happened to me as I continue doing Facebook Live videos.

And as your true self begins to shine through, there will be those folks who relate to your personality.

They’ll just like you!

And let’s be honest, therapy is so much better when you like your therapist.

Trust

I believe that trust is built through consistency.

Consistently show your audience that you care about them and provide them with valuable content and they will trust you over time.

Video can be a great medium to deliver that valuable content.

You can share meaningful stories, teach potential clients coping exercises or record a training video for them.

Over time you’ll be seen by your clients as an expert and someone worth trusting with the challenges they are facing.

The Biggest Con to Vlogging: Google Can’t Read Video

Video blogging has one major downfall: Google cannot index videos.

This means that just posting a video in a blog post is not enough to rank your content in search engines.

Luckily, there is a simple work around.

Always post your video with written, search engine optimized content to give the post context and allow Google to crawl through it.

You can write a summary of your video and make sure you include your keywords for SEO.

Another thing you can do is use a service like rev.com to create a written transcript of your video.

It may sound redundant, but this allows Google to crawl even more words and also provides text for folks who don’t want to watch the video.

So, Should You Start Vlogging?

Whether you should or shouldn’t start vlogging is really a personal preference.

It’s a great way to connect with your audience and the only downside (no SEO juice) can easily be overcome by providing text along with your videos.

But you have to do what makes the most sense for your personality and your business.

At the moment, I’m using video in the CMTW Facebook Community only and NOT on my blog.

If I didn’t have that Facebook group to connect with my audience via video, then yes, I’d probably be doing more video here on the blog.

For many, video is a scary thing and requires you to “put yourself out there” much more than writing.

I say give video a shot and see how you like it and what response you get.

You can always go back to old-fashioned blogging if it’s not working for you and your private practice.

Building a private practice is hard. Like any business, there can be ups and there can be downs as you figure out how to market your therapy services.

But the great news is, you don’t have to do it alone.

In this article, I’ll share advice from some of the leading coaches and teachers in private practice marketing.

Building a private practice is hard. Like any business, there can be ups and there can be downs as you figure out how to market your therapy services. But the great news is, you don’t have to do it alone. In this article, I’ll share with advice from some of the leading coaches and teachers in private practice marketing.

There are entire communities filled with successful therapists willing to share their support and advice on building a thriving practice.

But there’s also a growing number of coaches and experts who have made it their mission to help you succeed in private practice and overcome your biggest marketing challenges.

14 Marketing Secrets from Private Practice Experts

Whenever I need a little marketing inspiration for my own business, I turn to those who are further along and more skilled than I.

I listen to what they’re doing, what they’ve done and think about how it applies to my business.

I applied the same approach to help you with YOUR business.

Recently, I reached out to 14 of those private practice marketing gurus and asked them all just one question:

“What’s the MOST important lesson or tip you’ve learned about marketing a private practice?”

I’ve compiled all their marketing wisdom into an info-packed PDF – free as my gift to you!

Here’s a sample of some of the tips you’ll get when you download the PDF:

Tip #1: Market in Ways That Feel Authentic to You

If you find ways to market that feel authentic to you and your practice, the clients will roll in.

Two things typically get in the way of this:

  1. Feeling uncomfortable with marketing (I like to think of marketing as letting people know you’re out there. It’s not about convincing, it’s about connecting)
  2. Thinking you have to market in a way that worked for a colleague. There are at least 100 ways to market a practice. If you choose a few that are fun, you’ll be a more effective marketer and you’ll actually enjoy it.

allison puryear

– Allison Puryear
www.abundancepracticebuilding.com

Tip #7: Do Less & Do It Better

The most important lesson I’ve learned when it comes to marketing a private practice is to do less and do it better. Through helping therapists venturing into websites and online marketing,

I’ve noticed that those therapists that select a handful of marketing activities that they feel excited about tend to be able to sustain those activities over time.

Marketing requires this sustained, consistent effort but there will be no energy for making that effort if you’ve spread yourself too thin. Or, you’ll be doing a lot, but doing it poorly.

So the first step is to take the time to put together a simple strategy. Next, schedule time for your marketing activities in your week and set some goals. I suggest sticking to a marketing strategy for 90 days. At that 90 day point, check in and see how things are going and shift as needed.

Repeat this continuously and you will discover what works for you.

Don’t do all the marketing activities that exist. Do the marketing activities that you have discovered work for you. Take a lot of deep breaths, get help and support when you need it, and have fun!

kat love

– Kat Love
www.empathysites.com

Tip #12: Go A Mile Deep

I’ve always been scared of words like “marketing” and “putting myself out there.”

I began to reframe marketing as “connection” and that’s been helpful for me. Because all of us are good at that as clinicians. Related to this, I’m a big believer in building a few relationships with referral sources that have lots of depth as opposed to many with little depth.

Or as I like to remind myself, “Go a mile deep rather than a mile wide.

melvin varghese

– Melvin Varghese, PhD
www.sellingthecouch.com

Tip #13: Let Yourself Be Seen

You don’t have to share your deepest secrets, but you do need to let yourself be seen.

Your clients need and want to a glimpse into who they are trusting with the most intimate areas of their life. They need to know that you understand them and empathize with them.

You can’t connect deeply with everybody, so you have to be willing to get a bit specific and remember “when you try to speak to everyone, you speak to noone.”

Speaking from a niche mentality doesn’t mean you will only see that niche or one type of client, it just means in this moment you are making it easier for people who need you to find you, and speaking to them in that deep, heart place.

miranda palmer

– Miranda Palmer
www.zynnyme.com

Download the PDF to get 10 More Expert Marketing Tips

I’m so excited to share this new resource with you because it’s jam-packed with so many great tips for marketing a private practice.

I love how each teacher has their own view and strength when it comes to marketing.

So you’ll be getting a well-rounded view of what you can do focus your marketing efforts and grow your practice.

Just click on the banner below to get your free PDF, 14 Expert Secrets For Marketing Your Private Practice:

Click here to get free private practice marketing tips

The holiday season is a perfect time to slow things down (or at least attempt to!) and plan for the coming year. So, I’ve taken a break from publishing new articles for the month of December.

But I’m not going to leave you hanging. Below you’ll find some of my favorite and most popular articles in the Create My Therapist Website archives.

I hope you get to enjoy some of them while sitting by a fire sipping your favorite hot beverage.

1: The Complete Therapist’s Guide to Marketing a Private Practice

FB private practice marketing guide 1

This guide is an essential resource to anyone looking for new ideas and strategies for marketing their private practice.

From getting started to building a website, content marketing, SEO and getting more referrals, this guide has all you need to start marketing your private practice strategically and attracting more clients.

Check out the private practice marketing guide

2. My Best Articles About Pinterest

Pinterest is not JUST a place to find out how to make Christmas decor out of old palettes you found behind your favorite grocery store.

Pinterest is also one of the BEST ways to drive traffic to your private practice website.

So, here are all my articles and lessons related to growing your online presence using Pinterest.:

3. The Best SEO Resources

SEO (search engine optimization) doesn’t have to bring you pain in the new year.

If I had to sum up my best SEO advice to you, it would be this: consistently publish new content and know the most important places to put your keywords. Then, be patient.

But, if you want to dig a little deeper… below are some of my favorite SEO articles and resources to help you get found by your clients:

4. Creating A Website That Gets You Clients

Your website is one of the most important marketing tools you have.

If it’s not bringing in new client leads on the regular, then something has to change.

And that’s my passion.

I LOVE making websites and I love helping therapists create websites that propel their practice forward.

That’s why I offer one-on-one custom design services, as well as online courses… to help as many folks as I can grow their practice through their online presence.

The website we built for my wife was KEY to her building up a successful practice back in 2011 and I can’t stand by and let other therapists miss out.

Below are some of my favorite articles and resources to help you create the website your practice deserves:

4. And, Finally, Discounts on All Courses and Services

the best private practice marketing articles of 2017

To ring in the new year, I’ve created a coupon for 30% off all my online courses.

Purchase between now and when the ball drops to receive a discount on any and all trainings:

A Little Course About SEO:
10 Stupid Simple Things You Can Do To Optimize Pages or Blog Posts For Search Engines Consistently

A Little Course About WordPress:
Helping therapists take WordPress from a mysterious, scary and confusing beast to a friendly puppy, easy to navigate and use

The Blog Traffic Accelerator:
Explode Your Traffic Using A Simple Blogging System Combined With The Power of Pinterest

The Create My Therapist Website Toolbox:

Confidently Build Your Own Private Practice WordPress Website From Start to Finish… Even if you “lack the technical know-how”

Just click the links above or use the coupon code “ITSAWONDERFULLIFE2017”

But why stop with the courses? I’m also discounting my one-on-one services too:

Custom Website Design:

Ready to redesign your website or launch a new one? Just mention my favorite holiday movie, It’s A Wonderful Life, in the inquiry form and I’ll apply a 10% discount to your future project.

WordPress Maintenance & Support Packages:

Tired of wasting time keeping your WordPress files up to date or making changes to your website? Let me and my team do the work instead. Mention my favorite holiday movie, It’s A Wonderful Life, in the inquiry form and I’ll apply a 10% discount to your package.

That’s a wrap, 2017.

I hope you and your family have a blessed holiday season and wonderful new year.

For me, this year has been a whirlwind, seeing our first baby born and learning to run a business and balance a family. Quite the adventure!

I’ve also created some great friendships within the private practice community and have enjoyed so much connecting with more of my blog readers.

And look forward to creating more opportunities to connect in the new year.

Cheers to a great new year for you and private practice!

best private practice articles 2017 pin

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I hate to say it, but as clinicians, we can be a little slow on the entrepreneurial uptake. We’re often so focused on serving our clients well, that we struggle to come up for air and think about the professional side of our practices.

And, because we sometimes forget that we’re running a business as well as serving others, it’s not uncommon for those in the psychotherapy profession to neglect business-building activities.

I hate to say it, but as clinicians, we can be a little slow on the entrepreneurial uptake. We’re often so focused on serving our clients well, that we struggle to come up for air and think about the professional side of our practices. And, because we sometimes forget that we’re running a business as well as serving others, it’s not uncommon for those in the psychotherapy profession to neglect business-building activities.

For instance, the idea of incorporating or even relying on technology in our practices is still a bit scary and there is a definite tension when it comes to clinicians embracing modern ways of networking and marketing.

In fact, I literally get questions daily about how online marketing works and whether or not a fellow therapist actually needs a website.

As 2017 draws to an end and we approach 2018, the answer is an unwavering and astounding YES!

Yes, you need a website. But not only that, you need a well-designed website that is both visually appealing and speaks directly to your ideal client.

Now, I’m “technically” a millennial so my willingness to embrace technology may be a bit skewed, but I’m being really honest when I say that even my 90-year-old grandma has an iPhone.

This goes to show that no matter your ideal client population, they are online.

Your website is your greatest business asset.

It’s inexpensive to maintain and it works for you 24/7. Sure, there is an initial cost to set up a website properly, and whether you hire it out or create it yourself, there is a large commitment of either money or time up front.

But take that money you spend and divide it into an hourly wage, and you’ll see that your website is actually your most underpaid employee.

Your website is also your greatest gatekeeper.

When your content is written in a way that speaks directly to your ideal client, you will not only attract them to your practice but repel those that are not a good fit.

The same goes for posting your hours and fees online. Those who cannot fit into your schedule or afford your fees will move on. But, the calls that do come will be serious and motivated inquiries.

Perhaps the best thing about having a well-designed website, however, is the fact that it is a marketing machine.

I’m a big fan of in-person networking and believe it’s essential to growing and scaling any practice.

But, it’s just not possible to meet in person 24-hours a day. What’s more, a client in need whose anxiety has him up at 3 in the morning can’t go in and see his primary care doctor.

So, who better to turn to than good ol’ Google?

Having an attractive website allows you to still be available despite the time of day or circumstances. It also provides you with an internet home base which acts as the hub of your online marketing.

The Truth About Content and Online Marketing

By now, we are well aware that we must market our practices to see any kind of success.

There are just so many professionals in our field, that without a concentrated effort, we will never stand out from the crowd.

However, many of the traditional ways we are taught to promote ourselves: in-person networking, business events in the community, forming partnerships with doctors and psychiatrists, hosting open houses, etc. all demand so much effort that they leave little time for us to concentrate on what we do best – therapy.

The truth about internet marketing is that any AND everything that is posted online counts as content.

This includes the raging rant we posted five years ago after being pulled over for a broken taillight when there are “real” criminals out there. And, it also includes the picture from last week where we are shaking hands with the police chief after implementing a mental health system in the county jail.

Though hilarious (or mortifying – however you want to look at it), what’s difficult about marketing in 2017 and beyond is that nothing ever disappears from the internet.

If it’s been posted somewhere, whether immediately “deleted” or not, it is accessible by someone, somehow. This means that all of the content we have ever created contributes to our online reputation and our web presence.

The fortunate thing, though, is that content is cumulative. So, the more positive things you post about yourself personally and professionally, the better your reputation becomes.

This strategic curation of online content that highlights you and your practice in a positive way becomes what is known as your “brand.”

Positioning your brand’s message so it is easily accessible by those that most need your help is what is known as content marketing.

Content Marketing is an extremely powerful tool for attracting clients and building a practice with much less effort and overhead than ever before.

Utilizing blogs, videos, images, and website copy allows therapists to highlight themselves among all other clinicians in the area and position their practice as the one that is the best match for those needing services.

What’s more, recent surveys show that technology such as the internet and Smart Phones are not commodities.

Regardless of their socioeconomic status, clients are online.

Therefore, content marketing is one way to reach populations that might not ever find their way to therapy through traditional channels.

Lastly, content marketing is a fervent way for us to build practices we truly love and are excited about showing up to every day.

How Your Website Fits into A Content Marketing Strategy

Like I mentioned above, your website is the hub of your presence online.

It is where your brand lives and where all of your potential clients should be going to find out more about working with you.

The first impression, which is almost always visual, is what keeps these potential leads from immediately bouncing away from your site.

However, it is the web copy (read: content) that draws the reader in and converts them from a prospect to a paying client.

There are a few different ways a lead might land on your website.

They may find you directly by putting keyword phrases into a search engine, they may find your website listed on a directory, or they may stumble across your business or rack card.

In each of these cases, the prospect is what is considered a “cold” lead. They do not know you, and they have not received your name or contact information from anyone they trust.

Once they have found you online, the only thing cold leads have to go on when deciding whether or not you are a good fit for them is the copy on your website.

How you speak to potential clients has a profound effect on whether or not they pick up the phone to schedule with you. Talking directly to leads in a language that resonates will cause them to have an emotional reaction and believe that you truly understand what it is they are struggling with.

Ensuring that your website is filled to the brim with such tailored content is the quickest way to earn a prospect’s trust and encourage them to get in contact with you.

And it’s not much different for warm leads.

These are the people who come to your website through a referral. Whether they receive your name from a trusted doctor or loved one, in this day and age, the majority of people will still go to your website to learn more about you.

While warms leads are a bit more primed to schedule with you, they can still be turned off if they don’t believe that you are the right fit for them.

Talking in too general of a way is just not helpful. Without reaching leads at a core level, you will always leave readers of your website in a lukewarm state.

But, if you’re able to get to the core of the prospect’s struggles, and speak to them on each and every page of your site, you can elicit an emotional response and motivate them to pick up the phone.

So, what’s the key to speaking in a way that resonates with potential clients?

Choosing a niche.

What is Niche Marketing and Why Should Therapists Use It?

The idea of defining your niche is still a bit controversial in clinician circles.

One reason for this is there are some that think niching down is unethical as therapists who prefer a certain population are essentially denying services to some who may be in need.

The idea, however, is not to deny services, but to offer therapy at a higher skill level.

In fact, defining your ideal client allows you to hone your skills and become a specialist. So long as you are providing legitimate options and alternatives to those outside your niche, such as genuine referrals, you are not violating any ethical guidelines.

Another common hang-up about niching down is that some therapists believe it to be too restrictive to build a thriving practice.

It’s true, the second you decide to niche your practice, you are basically choosing to alienate a large segment of potential clients. By narrowing your focus to one slice of the population, you are effectively telling others that you do not serve them as well as you serve your chosen demographic.

This can be really scary, especially when clinicians are new to practice or do not have a full caseload.

But the reality is, defining your niche is the quickest way to fill a practice with clients you are excited to work with and that leave you feeling professionally fulfilled.

Incorporating niche marketing into your practice is the best way to write “tight” website copy.

Copy that is too loose or that has too many holes in it will not speak to your ideal clients. It gives them too many opportunities to turn their attention elsewhere.

However, web copy that is written with a niche in mind becomes sharp and provocative and resonates with readers at their core.

A Five-Step Niching Process

So now that you know the importance of your website and also how integral your web copy is to attracting your ideal client, it’s time to figure out how to go about defining your niche.

A lot of clinicians make the mistake of having a niche that is too wide.

Again, this probably goes back to the fear of repelling too many clients and operating from a scarcity mindset.

However, there are enough clients for every therapist to build a profitable practice, so there should be no fear about learning to attract a very narrow segment of the population.

A great tip is to imagine the act of defining your niche as building an upside-down pyramid.

The objective is to work from a wide scope and funnel the concept of your ideal client down until it becomes narrower and narrower.

At each stage, ask yourself questions about your ideal client like “what is at the core of their presenting problem” “what is underneath this complaint” and “what is really going on here” to help you really learn how to target them.

I always recommend going through this process five times so that you essentially narrow your niche down five levels.

An example of this is:

  1. Teenagers
  2. Teenagers whose grades have suddenly dropped
  3. Teenagers whose grades have suddenly dropped because they have developed test anxiety
  4. Teenagers whose grades have suddenly dropped and who have developed test anxiety because they are worried about getting into a good college
  5. Teenagers whose grades have suddenly dropped, who have developed test anxiety, and who are worried about getting into a good college because their older sibling graduated Suma Cum Laude from an Ivy League school

By the time you get to the fifth level, you have a completely clear idea of who you are marketing to and trying to attract to your practice.

Now, that does not mean that this is the only type of client you will see.

Some of your marketing will appeal to 20 or 30 somethings with anxiety or the parents of high-performing teens, but the core of your marketing message will resonate with a certain segment of the population which is the whole point.

This exercise isn’t always easy to do right off the bat and takes some practice, but once you get the hang of it, it can be fun to brainstorm different ideal client populations you’d like to serve.

If you need a little guidance when it comes to refining your niche, don’t worry, I’ve got you covered.

If you’d like to take your content marketing even further, by defining your ideal client, finding your ideal clients online and generating strategic, tailored website content, download your FREE 8-page workbook here >>> bit.ly/cliniciancontentworkbook

About Marissa Lawtonmarissa lawton portrait sm

Marissa Lawton is a licensed counselor, national board certified counselor, and member of the American Counseling Association. She is also an avid content marketer and lights up helping female clinicians build their private practices through strategic and tailored online marketing.

Marissa is the creator of The Clinician’s Guide to Content Marketing, a comprehensive system of masterclasses, concierge strategy calls, and boutique writing services that helps therapists identify their niche, find them online, and generate content that speaks directly to their ideal clients.

You can learn more about Marissa at risslawton.com