I’m starting something new today on the CMTW Blog! Each month, I plan to video review a private practice website from my audience, giving them a web designer’s initial thoughts and hopefully help them make some improvements and overcome some challenges.

Our first review is for Stephanie Konter’s website at http://www.stephaniekontercounseling.com.

You can watch the review by clicking on the video below:

I think Stephanie has done an excellent job creating a website for her counseling practice.

It’s clean and also well-organized. The navigation makes total sense to me and I had no problem finding information within her website.

My overall feedback for the website can really be summed up by encouraging Stephanie to focus on the potential client she’s trying to reach.

Adding a sentence to her homepage about who she helps and what she helps them achieve will help her website viewers quickly know that they are in the right place and what Stephanie does.

I love that she has a call to action right at the bottom of the homepage and I think she can sprinkle that around her website even more.

Folks will end up on different pages on the website, depending on what they’re seeking therapy for, so having that opportunity to connect on each page is a great thing to include.

I talk a little more about this in this post here: 12 Ways to Grow Your Therapy Practice with User Experience Design

Driving Traffic to Your Therapy Website

I asked each person to let me know about their biggest challenge they were facing with their website.

In the video I said that Stephanie was having trouble driving traffic to her website. But to clarify, she was specifically having trouble getting people to her counseling website from a Google search.

So I’ll expand a little on what I said in the video above.

Stephanie has been consistently adding blog posts to her website and I highly encourage her to continue doing that.

Blogging is a great way to expand on the amount of keywords that appear within your website, giving you more opportunities to be found in search engines.

I would encourage Stephanie to continue blogging, thinking about her potential clients and the issues they face, making sure her titles contain keywords when relevant.

I say “when relevant” because you should be writing blogs for people to read, not for Google to read.

Google is smart and will know when you’re keyword stuffing.

So be consistent, write for that ideal client, and I know you’ll see an increase in traffic.

For more on the benefits of blogging for therapists, check out this post here.

Another great way to increase your traffic from search engines is to create custom meta-descriptions for each page and blog post you create.

A meta-description is that short (1-2 sentences) you seen in search results that tell you what the page is about.
You want these descriptions to contain keywords and be enticing enough for someone to want to click on the link.

Jeff Guenther from The Practice Academy has an awesome resource all about meta-descriptions for your private practice website here.

Definitely check it out.

Do You Want Me to Review Your Private Practice Website?

I hope you found this website review helpful and you found a couple things you could improve in your own therapy website.

If you have any more encouragement or ideas for Stephanie, feel free to add that in the comments below.

If you wish to be considered for a future review, where I’ll go through your own private practice website, just fill out this form here.

If you want access to more tips, advanced tutorials, videos and cheat sheets, go ahead and join my VIP list, where you’ll get FREE access to a library of resources to help you create an awesome therapy website and market your practice online.

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